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Business Monitor International (BMI) offers a comprehensive range of products and services designed to help senior executives, analysts and researchers assess and better manage operating risks, and exploit business opportunities, across 175 markets. BMI offers three main areas of expertise: Country Risk BMI's country risk and macroeconomic forecast portfolio includes weekly financial market reports, monthly regional Monitors, and in-depth quarterly Business Forecast Reports. Industry Analysis BMI covers a total of 17 industry verticals through a portfolio of services, including Daily Alerts, monthly regional Insights, and in-depth quarterly Country Forecast Reports.

Croatia Defence & Security Report Q2 2014

Published by Business Monitor International on Mar 12, 2014 - 67 pages
PDF - Download Now with 3 Quarterly Updates format - Download Now
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BMI's Croatia Defence & Security Report examines the military and security posture of this Balkan nation. The report has been written to provide a comprehensive overview of the security challenges faced by Croatia both now, and in the future. Several facets of Croatia's defence and security posture are examined by the report including its defence procurement processes, military posture and strategic risks. The report posits that despite the current financial challenges faced by the country, Croatia is broadly continuing on a path of military modernisation.

In 2010 Croatia was spending US$919mn annually on defence. This figure fell to an estimated US$860mn in 2013, and we are forecasting a further fall to US$833mn in 2014. Thereafter the figure will begin to rise again, reaching US$960mn by the end of our forecast period, in 2018.

Croatia will need this trend of increased defence spending if it is to make good its intentions regarding the modernisation of its armed forces and the overhaul of the equipment which it maintains in service.

Croatia maintains three armed forces, namely the army, navy and air force, and does not have a distinct paramilitary force or gendarmerie body responsible for dealing with public order. In 2001 the country had a combined armed forces size of 68,300 personnel, a figure which had fallen to 21,600 by 2011.

Croatia has a defence manufacturing base, particularly in the fields of naval shipbuilding and land systems, but these companies perform only small-scale exports and the domestic market for their products is small to say the least. It remains to be seen how Croatia's defence manufacturing base will survive in the long term. Indeed, some of the country's defence companies are experiencing some significant difficulties in continuing their defence-related activities, with at least one company declaring bankruptcy in 2013.






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